Lecturer Failed Me for Not Contributing to Her Child's Naming Ceremony, Lady Reveals

A lady named Leena has gone viral for sharing her experience of being continuously failed by a female lecturer for not contributing towards her child’s christening ceremony. This shocking incident that has stirred up outrage online. The story has triggered a wave of shock and disappointment among netizens, who have taken to social media to express their disbelief at the culture where lecturers feel entitled to money from their students.

Lecturer Failed Me for Not Contributing to Her Child's Naming Ceremony, Lady Reveals

A lady named Leena has gone viral for sharing her experience of being continuously failed by a female lecturer for not contributing towards her child’s christening ceremony. This shocking incident that has stirred up outrage online.

According to Leena, the lecturer penalized her for an issue completely unrelated to her academic performance. In a video that has since gone viral, Leena explained that she did not donate money for her lecturer’s baby naming ceremony. While she did not specify if the donation was expected from the entire class, she revealed that the lecturer was furious over her refusal to contribute. 

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"I didn’t give up in school even though I was failed repeatedly because I did not contribute to her child’s christening," Leena wrote, reflecting on her determination to succeed despite the challenges she faced.

The story has triggered a wave of shock and disappointment among netizens, who have taken to social media to express their disbelief at the culture where lecturers feel entitled to money from their students. One user remarked, "You say what? These streets are wild, man," while another questioned, "Wait! Are you serious?"

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The incident has sparked a larger conversation about the ethical boundaries between students and lecturers, with many calling for greater transparency and accountability in academic institutions to prevent such exploitation in the future.